Resource Catalog2021-03-09T22:19:15+00:00

Food & Nutrition Resources

Skagit County Breastfeeding Coalition2021-12-28T22:36:02+00:00

Find community resources to support you on your path to nourish your new baby at the Skagit County Breastfeeding Coalition website.

Skagit Nature Rx – Nature Walks2021-05-03T18:10:35+00:00

Skagit Nature Rx is offering a new FREE nature walking program. Sign up today for an Out & About—Group Nature Walking program and learn how to maximize the health benefits of nature while exploring beautiful parks and trails across Skagit County. See our Nature Rx webpage for information!

DOH – Breastfeeding Friendly Washington2020-12-29T23:55:15+00:00

Click here for information on the WA State Department of Health’s Breastfeeding Friendly Washington (BFWA). BFWA encourages organizations to promote and support breastfeeding through changes in their policies and procedures.

WHO’s – Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding2020-12-29T23:45:42+00:00

Click here to see the World Health Organization’s Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding

How do I make the most of my FVRx Bucks?2020-11-16T21:24:21+00:00

Here are a few ideas to help you get the most fruits and veggies out of your FVRx Bucks: 

  • Weigh produce sold by the pound to get a rough estimate of the cost. 
  • Group produce into piles of about $5 to get an idea of the total. 
  • Shop seasonal and sale produce to get the best flavor and value. 
  • Consider using your bucks to purchase a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) box. If you’re interested, call 360-969-7191 ext. 3, or visit the Viva Farms website. 
  • Buy in bulk if it makes sense for your situation and storage. 
  • Many stores and farmer’s markets will let you sample produce or give you ideas about how to use items that are unfamiliar to you! Past participants shared how bucks gave them the freedom to try new foods. 
  • Shop the rainbow! More colors of fruits and veggies means a variety of vitamins and nutrients to keep you healthy. 
  • It can be helpful to wash and cut up veggies and store them in the fridge. Then you can just grab a healthy snack when hunger strikes. 
What happens when my produce purchase is greater or less than $5 increments?2020-11-16T21:20:50+00:00

When using your FVRx Bucks to purchase fresh produce, it is unlikely that your total will be an even number that can be bought using only $5 bills. If, for example, your total comes to $13.02, you have three options: 

  1. Pay the remainder with your own money (use $10 in FVRx Bucks and $3.02 of your own money). 
  2. Use only FVRx Bucks and pay slightly more than the total (use $15 in FVRx Bucks, but receive no change). 
  3. Select a bit more produce to make up the difference (for example, add a couple of apples to your purchase and bring the total to $14.55). 
How do I use my FVRx Bucks?2020-11-16T21:14:03+00:00
  1. Go to any participating store or farmers market with your FVRx Bucks. 
  2. Select fresh fruits, vegetables, and herbs you want to purchase with your FVRx Bucks. For produce sold by the pound, get a rough estimate of the cost by weighing as you go. This will help you know how many FVRx Bucks you will need to use. 
  3. When checking out, separate the produce you intend to purchase with Bucks from your other groceries, as they will be rung up separately. 
  4. Pay for your fresh produce with FVRx Bucks. Then pay for your other groceries as usual.
  5. Go home and prepare delicious food with the fresh fruits and vegetables you have purchased! 
What is the difference between FVRx Bucks and regular cash?2021-01-14T03:59:19+00:00

In many ways, FVRx Bucks are like regular cash. They are a similar size and shape to regular paper money, they are unique and non-replaceable, and they can be used at a participating store or farmers market in place of regular cash. There are, however, a few key differences between regular money and FVRx Bucks: 

  • Bucks may be spent on all fresh fruits, vegetables, and herbs only. Because Skagit FVRx is designed to help participants explore the health benefits and natural flavors of fresh produce, frozen, canned, dried, or otherwise prepared foods are not eligible for purchase with your bucks. 
  • No change is given for FVRx Bucks. Click here to find out more.  
  • FVRx Bucks are distributed every month. However, Bucks do not expire until the end of the program (December 2021), so you have plenty of time to shop when it’s convenient for you!  
  • FVRx Bucks can be used at any participating retail store or farmers markets in Burlington, Concrete, Mount Vernon, or Sedro-Woolley.  

Click here for a simple, step-by-step explanation of how to use your FVRx Bucks at the store or farmers market. 

Where can I spend my FVRx Bucks?2021-12-22T22:18:06+00:00
Click here to see where you can use FVRx Bucks
Basic Food2020-11-10T16:59:44+00:00

Basic Food provides monthly benefits to supplement grocery money while promoting healthy eating and reducing food insecurity. Benefits are automatically loaded onto an electronic benefits transfer (EBT) card bi-monthly. EBT cards can be used to buy food at participating grocery stores. For more information, including eligibility and how to apply, visit our Basic Food webpage.

Viva Farms CSA subscription2021-05-18T15:27:33+00:00

The Viva Farms’ CSA is a subscription to receive weekly boxes of farm-fresh organic produce, grown by the farmers in their program. By joining Viva Farms’ CSA, you are directly contributing to beginning farmers’ success in building viable farm businesses. For more information, visit the Viva Farms website.

Trek for Treasure2020-11-10T16:51:30+00:00

Trek for Treasure is a summer adventure program that invites teams of two or more people to complete a series of hikes in the area. Hidden clues at the end of each hike help you solve riddles in your quest to find the hidden treasure!  This is a great way to enjoy the outdoors and engage in an active lifestyle. Visit the Trek for Treasure website for more information.

Skagit Gleaners2020-11-10T01:31:35+00:00

Skagit Gleaners provides fresh and nutritious food to help working families achieve personal financial and health goals. They do this by rescuing and redistributing surplus fresh food to their members. Their market is located at: 1021 Riverside Dr, Mt Vernon. Visit the Skagit Gleaners website for more information.

How can I find out if I’m eligible for WIC benefits?2020-10-16T20:05:22+00:00

WIC is for pregnant people, new and breastfeeding moms, and children under 5 years old. If one or more of these applies to you, check the income eligibility chart here, or give us a call us at (360) 854-0435.

How do I apply for Basic Food?2021-11-12T01:52:27+00:00

We can help you apply for Basic Food over the phone! Just give us a call at (360) 854-7168.  If you prefer, you can complete this Basic Food application assistance appointment form to make an appointment for us to call you.

What are the long-term benefits of a farm to school program?2020-10-16T18:03:38+00:00

If a Farm to School program has been present for a long period of time, there are significant long-term benefits associated for that school and that community. An established program has rapport among the school district, the teachers, and the students. It is fully integrated into the school day and an expected and anticipated part of the curriculum of each grade. This means every grade has guaranteed experiential, inquiry-based education as part of their school experience. Students understand how to grow and cook their own food, and know exactly where their food comes from. This encourages healthy eating and a more active lifestyle over time, as these students pass this knowledge to their parents, and to their own children as well. The repercussions are ripples of learning and health that extend outward, creating an overall healthier community over time. 

What are tips for cooking with kids?2020-10-16T18:03:52+00:00

Cooking with kids is a complex yet highly rewarding process. The most essential tip we have is to establish clear systems with classes so that kids know exactly what to expect and what to do when it is time to cook. Safety procedures need to be a part of this system, especially when cooking with heat and/or when using any type of sharp utensils. Split the class into groups and have an adult present at each group, especially with younger grades. Make expectations and steps of the process very clear. For younger grades, prepare the recipe step by step with the students, having them take turns to do each step. For older grades, encourage them to split the tasks among themselves so that they are working as a team. Emphasize cleaning up as a group and setting the tables, if possible. Having everyone eat the meal they have made together is a heartwarming finish. It may feel chaotic at first, but once your systems are down and the students know what to expect, it is among the most rewarding and laughter-filled activities one can do with kids. Many of our initial resources came from Edible Schoolyard; adapt to your scenario as you see fit. https://edibleschoolyard.org/curriculum

What ages/grade level participate in farm to school?2021-05-03T17:43:15+00:00

Any grade can participate in Farm to School! It depends on the school district, the nature of the program, and the relationship the program has with the school and the teachers. In Concrete, we have garden and cooking classes for grades K-8 throughout the school year, and also facilitate hands-on tasks with high school food science and culinary arts classes. In the summers, we run a high school work internship as well as help with summer camps for kids entering grades K-8 in a partnership with Concrete Boys and Girls Club.

Where do donations go, and how are they used?2020-10-16T18:04:12+00:00

Donations to Farm to School are mainly used to help fund running our garden and cooking classes throughout the school year. This includes buying food, kitchen supplies and utensils, seeds and starts for the gardens, and tools for use in the gardens, among many other things. Donations also help fund summer programming and help pay student interns as well as purchase much needed supplies for garden upkeep and school grounds maintenance. Please make an online donation today!

What volunteer opportunities are there?2020-10-16T18:04:20+00:00

There are multiple volunteer opportunities for Farm to School. You can volunteer to help take care of the school garden care and maintenance, which is especially helpful over weekends and during the summer, when students are not present. You can help out in garden or cooking classes during the school day as an extra adult to help lessons go smoothly. Other opportunities come up throughout the year as well with events or specific needs; contact your Farm to School program coordinator or fill out our volunteer form and we will be in touch!

Why is Farm to School important?2020-10-16T18:04:30+00:00

Farm to School is important for many reasons. It connects kids and communities to where their food comes from, and through growing and cooking their own food, healthier habits are formed. It allows space for experiential, hands-on education outside that is built into the school day. It also creates spaces for teamwork, exploration, collaboration, and inquiry, all of which are essential to the healthy development of children and adolescents.

How can I get Farm to School recipes?2020-10-16T18:04:40+00:00

All of our Farm to School recipes and cooking videos can be found here.

How do you choose what fruit or veggie to feature in Harvest of the Month?2020-10-16T18:04:49+00:00

We choose the Harvest of the Month based on seasonality of produce (what’s growing in that particular month!), availability at local farms, and ease of preparation. As we’ve developed relationships with our local farms, it’s been easier to predict which month will have which vegetable!

I’m a farmer. How can I sell my produce to a local school?2020-10-16T18:04:58+00:00

A good place to start is by reaching out to your school district’s Food Service Director. Keep in mind that this is usually a very busy person, responsible for hundreds or perhaps thousands of meals a day and that they are already doing a good job! School food budgets are also extremely tight, so be aware that they will likely not be able to meet your price point. Nonetheless, working with school meal programs is incredibly rewarding! Concrete students know the day our local farmer runs out of carrots and food service has to go back to buying them from our local distributor because they are less sweet! If you are interested in working with the Concrete or Sedro-Woolley school districts, please contact our program coordinators for more information.

How do I get involved with your vocational training (high schoolers)?2021-05-03T16:10:12+00:00

Our vocational program is currently only available to high school students (sophomores or juniors at the time of application) in the Concrete School District. If this is you, please contact the Concrete Farm to School program coordinator for more information. Positions are advertised in the spring at UnitedGeneral.org/Join-Our-Team.

How do you decide what recipes to make?2020-10-16T18:05:15+00:00

We choose recipes that feature fruits and vegetables as main ingredients, have lots of jobs to involve many students, and can be prepared in a 60-minute class session (including set up, eating, and clean up!). Many of our favorites have been adapted from the Edible Schoolyard, but we’ve also developed our own recipes over the years that coordinate with our garden’s harvest, academic standards, and teacher and student interests. We also cook almost exclusively vegetarian in our classroom.

How are your programs funded?2020-10-16T18:05:25+00:00

Our programs are funded through a variety of community, foundational, and federal grants and donations from organizations and individuals. Please see our Partners and Funders for more information.

How do I get Farm to School in my area?2020-10-16T18:05:35+00:00

Maybe it’s already there! Check in with your food service director, school principal, or parent-teacher organization to find out what efforts are already being made to connect students to food and gardening. The National Farm to School Network is a good place to learn more. 

Mental Health Promotion Resources

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs – access to services, self-help information, and more2021-01-05T01:12:43+00:00

Visit the Suicide Prevention page at the V.A. website for resources on preventing suicide among our veterans.

Suicide prevention for farmers/ranchers — Washington State University Skagit Extension2021-01-06T17:51:49+00:00

Agriculture is known to be a dangerous occupation full of potential stressors like weather, changing economic markets, and machinery breakdowns. When these start to compound many farmers experience excessive stress, making it hard to move forward to positive solutions. Click here for information on coping with these stressors.

Alliance of Hope – finding a support group after loss2021-01-05T01:13:31+00:00

Find a support group for suicide loss survivors at the Alliance of Hope website.

American Association of Suicidology – resources for loss survivors2021-01-06T18:01:31+00:00

Find out how to help survivors of suicide at the Suicidology.org website

Crisis Connections SOS – local support, resources, and training2021-01-05T01:14:14+00:00

Healing from a suicide loss can be a long and difficult journey, but you are not alone. Visit the Crisis Connections website. CC Cares is a program for those newly bereaved by suicide from those who have been there.

Means Matter – Harvard School of Public Health’s Injury Control and Research Center2021-01-05T01:14:32+00:00

Visit Harvard’s Means Matter website for information on suicide, guns, and public health.

Safer Homes, Suicide Aware2021-01-05T01:14:47+00:00

Visit the Safer Homes, Suicide Aware website – Seattle-based coalition of firearm retailers, Second Amendment rights groups, health care providers, and suicide prevention experts

Now Matters Now – skills and support for coping with suicidal thoughts2021-01-05T01:15:03+00:00

Visit the Now Matters Now website for skills and support in coping with suicidal thoughts.

Forefront Suicide Prevention – a Center of Excellence at the University of Washington2021-05-18T15:25:40+00:00

Forefront Suicide Prevention is a Center of Excellence at the University of Washington focused on reducing suicide by empowering individuals and communities to take sustainable action, championing systemic change, and restoring hope.

Coping Skills Worksheets2021-01-05T01:15:34+00:00

Get 10+ Coping Skills Worksheets for Adults and Youth — click here.

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